New book offers a look into history of Seven Springs | Lifestyles

SEVEN SPRINGS — A simple question about the addresses of Seven Springs sprawled into massive amounts of research, resulting in a history book about the area.

“The county recently changed our addresses. They came thru and its a little bit of a long story as to why, but it has to do 911 and GIS maps and things, and they actually changed everyone’s address down here,” said Mary Ellen Reardon, author of “Seven Springs Country Club : A Century of Stewardship.”

The change of addresses has been a two-year process. Reardon said she’s lived in her home for 20 years, and it’s like they moved without moving. She said it got her thinking about how the addresses even came about down at Seven Springs.

The first information Reardon could find was around 1945 when the homes were listed going up from one. So every cottage had a number, but it was “Cottage -1, Cottage -2” and so on. People still aren’t sure who gave them numbers initially; some believe it was the electric company when everyone was connected to electricity grid.

Reardon said they’re a little bit like a Horseshoe Lake and they don’t own the land the houses are on. The association owns the land, and they become members and part-owners of the club. She said people can’t just go to the county buildings and look up the address and search it; there were no deeds.

So Reardon began to go through the old files. She started making a list of who lived in everyone’s house. It ended up turning into a much bigger project.

“Every little lead I went down led me to something else. It just became incredibly interesting more than anything,” she said.

The Russell family in Batavia bought the land and it was turned into protected area. When purchased it was swampy pasture land. So the Russells and other businessmen in Batavia began planting trees in 1911 — more than 40,000 trees.

Reardon said she found out the area was special to the Native Americans.

“There was a bunch of paths and things through here. When the Native Americans would come through here and stop, this was always this peaceful land to them. So they would always lay their weapons and they would come and do what they needed to do,” she said. “But there was never any fighting down in this area.”

The book is available on Amazon. Reardon is working on getting copies to the Holland Land Office Museum, 131 West Main St., Batavia. She also donated a couple of copies to the Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St., Batavia.

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