Dog Training Requires Respecting the Deep Emotional Lives of Dogs

Dogs have rich and deep emotional lives. Science clearly shows that dogs are sentient, feeling beings.1 When I learned about the rigorous science—cognitive ethology and affective neuroscience—and psychology behind an educational approach called Affective Dog Behavior (ADB)—the importance of tapping into what’s happening in their heads and hearts and focusing on their unique personalities—and their support of Linda Michael’s The Hierarchy of Dog Needs “translated into dog” based on Abraham Maslow’s groundbreaking work, I wanted to learn more about it. Here’s what Scott Stauffer, who coined the term K9 Life Coach, had to say.2

Marc Bekoff: Why did you develop Affective Dog Behavior?

SS: The usual way in today’s dog training, whether reward- or punishment-based, is that behavior is strictly assessed on what you see and then [you] use the particular approach to shape the dog by changing the dog’s behavior.

Minnie happily launching into a zoomie.

Source: Lisa Kalfas, with permission.

Though I followed the same path early in my career, I had questions that took me deeper into the brain of the animal. I found many answers in neuroscience, particularly in Dr. Jaak Panksepp’s Affective Neuroscience, as well as in the mental health field. The science is already there—we “just” have to translate it into “dog.”

For this reason, we—Diana Kastner and I—developed Affective Dog Behavior (ADB) to be an educational program based on a continuously updated collection of scientific research and bring it into the dog industry. We realize the importance of at least the basic science of the brain and its practical application to be made more accessible.

MB: Who are your intended clients?

SS: Anyone who doesn’t feel connected to their animals. Anyone who wants to help others connect to their animals. People who don’t feel safe with their dogs and dogs that don’t feel safe with them. In short, anybody who wants to learn about emotions and the emotional canine brain, be it dog trainers, doggie daycare staff, rescue staff and volunteers, dog sitters, dog walkers, or private individuals.

MB: What are some of your major messages and do you have any particular methods you weave into your approach to training?

SS: Emotions affect behavior! Understanding basic human and canine neurobiology can greatly help us in working with other species. Since the canine brain and human brain are very similar, Affective Dog Behavior is all about mental health, emotional and physical safety, and social and emotional connections.

We do not use rigid protocols or particular methods in our approach, as they are mostly created with the human, not the dog, in mind. Additionally, dogs have their own individual “protocols” for dealing with the ups and downs of life, and most human protocols don’t consider the dog’s internal processes. Ideally, your dog will look to you to feel safe—if a dog is triggered, it means he does not feel safe in that moment. We can’t undo the past by protocol, but we can help dogs feel safe in their way with our emotional support and recover together afterward.

MB: Why is positive force-free dog training the only way to go?

SS: We don’t need to make life more challenging by forcing our dogs into anything, or intentionally causing pain, harm, or any other added stressors. However, we do have a responsibility to assure our dogs’ safety, and that may, at times, entail that we are either in verbal or physical control when leash laws or common sense call for it.

Although sometimes we must do things our dogs aren’t particularly fond of, there is never the time, place, or need to purposely inflict pain or flood a dog. Such practices as well as non-caring attitudes—“you’ll get over it”—can do serious harm and damage a relationship. Dogs are adaptable, but they are not immune to emotional scars.

MB: How does your approach differ from others that are concerned with some of the same general topics?

SS: One major difference is that Affective Dog Behavior is not a training program but an educational program. We put more emphasis on connection than on changing behaviors, simply because many so-called problem behaviors either become less of an issue or are greatly eliminated once the dog feels heard, wanted, or acknowledged. The need for connection is innate, and even millions of years of evolution have not undone something that has served social animals so well.3

We look at internal processes to learn why and how behaviors happen, and the importance of all of the primary seven primary emotional systems identified by Jaak Panksepp. We understand that when a dog goes into a non-social state of fear or rage it is due to an unmet need, and this state is only temporary before the brain will go back to being more social. Thus, we help the dog want to be more social again on their terms and their time. None of these internal processes can be switched off, and coping is up to the individual, yet easier with a friend. If dogs are being coerced to suppress their emotions, they don’t have much room to express themselves.

Not only do we utilize the latest science to understand behaviors, but we use it to bring back our own emotionality with dogs, which has been somewhat lost since we became too focused on “assimilating” dogs to our lifestyle. We are not just about dogs: Connection is two-fold, and we need to include humans. Both parties have the same need to feel safe.

MB: Are you hopeful that as people learn more about the amazing lives of dogs they will treat them with more respect and dignity?

SS: Understanding more can create empathy and I am sure that people have the best of intentions. They nurture their relationships with dogs to the best of their knowledge, which is usually influenced by societal expectations, by what they have been taught, or what they have picked up over the years. Therefore, we need to do more for education.

As trainers, we have a responsibility to educate ourselves, adding new knowledge as it becomes available.4 After all, we can only help our human and canine clients if we have answers that make sense to them!

Related Articles

The Fine Art of Blowing Up Pipelines in a Post-Truth Era

I've always found conspiracy theories to be fascinating, not just individually, but as a concept in and of itself. I spent the darker...

‘Black Adam’ Post-Credit Scene Videos Leaked From Global Premiere Are Taken Down by Twitter

After Warner Bros.' global premiere of the DC superhero movie “Black Adam” in New York, footage of the film's post-credit scene leaked onto...

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Stay Connected

0FansLike
0FollowersFollow
0SubscribersSubscribe
- Advertisement -

Latest Articles

The Fine Art of Blowing Up Pipelines in a Post-Truth Era

I've always found conspiracy theories to be fascinating, not just individually, but as a concept in and of itself. I spent the darker...

‘Black Adam’ Post-Credit Scene Videos Leaked From Global Premiere Are Taken Down by Twitter

After Warner Bros.' global premiere of the DC superhero movie “Black Adam” in New York, footage of the film's post-credit scene leaked onto...

Best comedy podcasts for kids

We've rounded up comedy...

Vegan Dog Food: Vet-Recommended Brands And What Pet Parents Should Know – DodoWell

With vegan and vegetarian diets becoming more and more popular, some pet parents who've made the leap are wondering if their dogs can also...